Why our Workshops?

Developing a Workforce

 

Working as an Operations Manager for a large Residential Care organisation, I was often disillusioned with the training provided for workers. Although it might appear to meet the needs of the organisation, it was often generic and therefore didn’t pack a punch or really hit home. Therefore, it was often forgotten as the delegates left the training room.

I know training is good when I can see it weeks later in the practice of those who attended and in terms of people services, reflected in those that use the service. Training outcomes must be evident in a service if the training is worthwhile and workers empowered by the investment.

Back then, I started where I could, meeting with training providers beforehand, looking at their ideas and incorporating my own. It was important to me that the training we purchased wouldn’t only tick a box but would also influence, inform and inspire those attending. It wasn’t possible to do this all the time but where I could it made a noticeable difference.

Working Therapies Workshops

 

In setting up Working Therapies, we wanted to continue this as workshop providers. There are a number of workshop models we have created, but our primary aim is to meet with organisations to hear what’s important to them. It’s paramount that we hear about the strengths of the workforce, the issues that need addressing and how best the organisation think this can be achieved. From this we can then put the ideas from our discussion directly into the workshop model, transforming it into a workshop that speaks directly to those attending. I’d go as far as saying this is the only way we work; if we can’t meet and discuss the training requirements fully beforehand then we wouldn’t be sticking to our values as a therapeutic service / business.

As much as we would prefer a face to face meeting in terms of workshop preparation, it can happen over the telephone or via Skype. What’s important, is that we meet the people who understand the workforce and its goals rather than somebody whose job it is to book training and tick boxes, having no real idea of the actual work and impact on workers.

The first thing we want to achieve in group work, be it a training workshop or any other therapeutic service is to build rapport, show interest and listen. When we plan our events in this way, we believe, we have started to build the relationship required for an effective session before entering the training room. When we understand an organisation, its model, goals and longer-term plans along with problem areas we have a much better chance of building a solid relationship with the organisation and the individuals working within it.

If you want to find out more about our workshops, please do get in touch at info@workingtherapies.co.uk and one of us will get straight back to you.

 


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